The Death of Lazarus; Learning Under Jesus

Note: This series is written as a first-person narrative to present Jesus in the context he walked in with the unknown disciple that narrates introducing my thoughts and sparking more ideas with his questions. Enjoy.

One day, a man came running up to us. He stopped, gasping for air. In between breaths, he told us he was from Bethany. A town about a mile away from Jerusalem.

A town we’ve been avoiding since there were people there plotting to kill Jesus.

“I must speak with Jesus,” he said.
“Why,” Peter asked, looking at the man suspiciously.
“Lazarus is sick!”

He was from Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha. So the sisters sent word to Jesus, “Lord, the one you love is sick.”

We took him to Jesus.

maxresdefault (3)When he heard this, Jesus said, “This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God’s glory so that God’s Son may be glorified through it.

Bethany was a day’s walk from where we were. Who knew how long this messenger had been looking for us. Jesus seemed confident, and we stayed in this town for two more days as he taught.

On the second day since getting the message, he said to us, “Let us go back to Judea.

“But Rabbi,” Nathaniel said, “a short while ago the Jews there tried to stone you, and yet you are going back?”

Jesus answered, “Are there not twelve hours of daylight? Anyone who walks in the daytime will not stumble, for they see by this world’s light. It is when a person walks at night that they stumble, for they have no light.

We looked at each other, a bit confused.

Jesus continued, “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep, but I am going there to wake him up.

John replied, “Lord if he sleeps, he will get better.”

Jesus shook his head, saying, “Lazarus is dead, and for your sake, I am glad I was not there, so that you may believe. But let us go to him.

Then without looking back, Jesus set out.

Thomas said to the rest of us, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”

John 11:1-16

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